International Journal of Noncommunicable Diseases

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 115--119

Diabetic care delivery with package of essential noncommunicable diseases interventions protocol in rural Nepal: A district hospital-based study


Pawan Agrawal1, Priyanka Gupta2, Bikash Gauchan1, Biplav Shrestha1 
1 Department of General Practice, Bayalpata Hospital, Nyaya Health - Possible, Achham, Nepal
2 Department of General Practice, Bayalpata Hospital, Nyaya Health - Possible, Achham; Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, Bluecross Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Pawan Agrawal
Suite 700, Floor 7, Bluebird Complex, Tripureshwor, Kathmandu
Nepal

Background: Diabetes ranks fourth among the noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in terms of proportional mortality in Nepal and is increasingly diagnosed in rural population. We aimed to evaluate the care delivery in diabetes patients in a rural primary care hospital that had implemented the World Health Organization's Package of essential NCDs interventions (PEN) protocol. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive study in a rural district hospital. The study was conducted over 5 months and was undertaken as a part of the quality improvement project in the hospital. Data were extracted from the electronic medical record of the hospital after approval from hospital administration. Results: The total diabetic patient visits during the study period were 682 of 30,758 total outpatient visits (2%). There were 240 unique diabetic patients. The age ranged from 25 to 82 years with the median age of 52. Glycated hemoglobin was done in 15 of 59 new cases and in 33 of 181 follow-up cases. Urine protein was assessed in 65 of 240 patients. Comorbidities and complications were documented in 96 of 240 patients (40%), hypertension being the most common. Fifty-six patients (23%) had obtained control as per the target levels with different modalities of treatment, 69 (29%) had partial control, 85 (35%) struggled to reach targets, and 30 (13%) failed to appear in follow-up visits. Conclusion: The study described our adherence to the PEN protocol and identified several areas of improvement in our diabetes care delivery such as continuous medical education activities and monitoring of care delivery with similar study in future after implementation of proposed interventions.


How to cite this article:
Agrawal P, Gupta P, Gauchan B, Shrestha B. Diabetic care delivery with package of essential noncommunicable diseases interventions protocol in rural Nepal: A district hospital-based study.Int J Non-Commun Dis 2018;3:115-119


How to cite this URL:
Agrawal P, Gupta P, Gauchan B, Shrestha B. Diabetic care delivery with package of essential noncommunicable diseases interventions protocol in rural Nepal: A district hospital-based study. Int J Non-Commun Dis [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Mar 23 ];3:115-119
Available from: http://www.ijncd.org/article.asp?issn=2468-8827;year=2018;volume=3;issue=4;spage=115;epage=119;aulast=Agrawal;type=0