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ORIGINAL ARTICLE-CONSENSUS STATEMENT
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 118-121

Chandigarh Call For Action on sustainable development in combating global epidemic of noncommunicable diseases: Consensus statement of World Noncommunicable Disease Congress, Chandigarh, India, November 4-6, 2017


Draft Committee for Consensus Statement of World NCD Congress 2017, India

Date of Web Publication22-Feb-2018

Correspondence Address:
J S Thakur
President World NCD Federation, Chair, World NCD Congress 2017 and Professor, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jncd.jncd_43_17

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  Abstract 


During World NCD Congress 2017 the special sessions on Policy forum, Parliamentarian Forum, Youth Parliament and Ministerial Forum, the inputs from Policy makers, parliamentarians, youth and health ministers of different countries and regions across the globe were incorporated on the prevention, control and management of Noncommunicable diseases. The Consensus statement was developed with the areas focusing on Health Promotion, Disease prevention, Global, National and Subnational Initiatives for health, social and economic burden of NCDs for Chandigarh, India.

Keywords: Chandigarh, Declaration, Health promotion, noncommunicable diseases


How to cite this article:
Thakur J S. Chandigarh Call For Action on sustainable development in combating global epidemic of noncommunicable diseases: Consensus statement of World Noncommunicable Disease Congress, Chandigarh, India, November 4-6, 2017. Int J Non-Commun Dis 2017;2:118-21

How to cite this URL:
Thakur J S. Chandigarh Call For Action on sustainable development in combating global epidemic of noncommunicable diseases: Consensus statement of World Noncommunicable Disease Congress, Chandigarh, India, November 4-6, 2017. Int J Non-Commun Dis [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Oct 15];2:118-21. Available from: http://www.ijncd.org/text.asp?2017/2/4/118/225975



  1. Gathered in the city of Chandigarh on the occasion of the World Noncommunicable Disease (NCD) Congress, November 6, 2017, we the participants consider “health promotion” and “disease prevention” as a social movement. Further we:


  2. 1.1. Note with great concern that NCDs, principally cardiovascular diseases, cancers, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases have overtaken communicable diseases and become the leading cause of death and disability worldwide especially in developing nations and is subsequently, affecting the productivity, economics and overall development of majority of countries globally; and NCDs are preventable in nature

    1.2. Recognize that mental, behavioural and substance abuse disorders are important contributors to the burden of NCDs

    1.3. Recognize that injuries and disabilities also add significantly to the disease burden, alongside NCDs

    1.4. Recognize that other conditions such as chronic kidney disease, neurological disorders including stroke, epilepsy, autism and dementia, musculoskeletal disorders including osteoarthritis, geriatric disorders, nutritional disorders, oral and dental diseases, physical disabilities including blindness and deafness, diseases among elderly, occupational and environmental diseases including pollution (e.g., water, air) and all other chronic health conditions also contribute to the growing burden of NCDs

    1.5. Express concern that the rising burden of NCDs is putting a strain on the already compromised healthcare systems in developing countries and the overall cost of diagnosis and management of NCDs are impoverishing individuals, communities and nations

    1.6. Recognize that the burden of NCDs is projected to escalate in the future due to changing lifestyle, population ageing, trade and intensive marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages, poor hygienic conditions and changing dietary patterns of the global population with increasing energy intake and reducing physical activity as a result of rapid and unplanned urbanization in the developing countries

    1.7. Emphasize that NCDs affect more vulnerable and economically poorer segments of society thus affecting them more adversely

    1.8. Realize that in addition to the huge disease burden, NCDs and their risk factors have serious socioeconomic and environmental consequences e. g., exacerbating poverty and adversely affecting the national economy

    1.9. Understand that the major NCDs are linked to common risk factors, namely tobacco use in all forms, unhealthy diet especially high consumption of fats, salt and sugar, physical inactivity, obesity, harmful use of alcohol and stress; and being aware that these factors have economic, social, political and environmental determinants, understand further that they require a multi-pronged and multi-sectoral response

    1.10. Realize the need to promote awareness regarding NCDs and their risk factors (including their nonhealth determinants) at the population level, policy making and planning level

    1.11. Understand the importance of addressing NCD risk factors and providing universal access to appropriate interventions at all levels of the health care delivery system

    1.12. Acknowledge that recognition of roles of multiple stakeholders/partners including the Government, civil society, academia, pharma sector, researchers, professional associations/organizations, sectors outside health and the private sector (excluding tobacco interests) are vital for prevention and control of NCDs

    1.13. Note with concern that millions of people affected by NCDs suffering from severe pain, other debilitating symptoms and complications can be effectively treated by providing essential medicines, palliative care and rehabilitation as a continuum of care

    1.14. Note that Yoga practice as essential part of mental health program and lifestyle intervention in all NCDs.

  3. We, the participants of the World NCD congress 2017, therefore call upon the governments to translate their commitment into action at national and sub-national level for reducing the health, social and economic burden of NCDs by:


  4. 2.1. I nvesting in health systems for universal access and delivery of essential NCD packages for health promotion, NCD prevention, management and rehabilitation including palliative care

    2.2. Involving multiple sectors to plan, co-ordinate, implement, monitor and evaluate NCD-related activities, headed by high-level empowered committees or any such mechanisms at national and sub national levels

    2.3. Increasing the budget for health promotion; screening (for early detection), surveillance, management and control of NCDs

    2.4. Strengthening primary healthcare system and introduce community based approaches to make them more responsive to NCDs needs and widen their reach and scope for health promotion, prevention and control of NCDs

    2.5. Building capacity for policy makers, program managers and key stakeholders to plan, develop, implement, monitor and evaluate NCD programs and upgrading skills of health workforce at all levels of the health care system for NCD prevention and care through continuous professional development programs

    2.6. Building capacity through trade, industrial tactics and legal instruments to minimize the progression of NCDs and risk factors

    2.7. Mainstreaming health promotion within broader national health and developmental agenda and programs of all ministries directly or indirectly involved in improving health of people

    2.8. Promoting an enabling environment that reduces the common NCD risk factors (stress, tobacco use, diets high in saturated fats and or transfats, salt and sugar, physical inactivity, obesity and harmful use of alcohol) using a range of options including legislation, regulation, fiscal measures, public education and awareness, promoting healthy eating habits, public health policies and programs

    2.9. Accelerating the implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and other international instruments and strategies that address NCDs directly or indirectly

    2.10. Promoting healthy settings and enabling environments for enhancing physical activity at the family, work place, school, community, health institutions and other relevant levels

    2.11. Integrating the promotion and protection of human rights into national NCD policies, ensuring particular attention is paid to girls, women, adolescents, orphans, children, older people, migrants and people affected by humanitarian emergencies, indigenous groups and persons with disabilities, depending on local circumstances

    2.12. Addressing NCDs and their risk factors using a life cycle approach and overcoming gender inequalities in access of appropriate health care, resources, opportunities and information on NCD prevention and treatment in the context of family health care

    2.13. Promoting use of information technologies like Tele-Medicine, mhealth to improve access of NCD services

    2.14. Facilitating active involvement of a wide range of government Ministries and Departments outside the health sector (such as Agriculture, Human Resource Development, Women and Child Development, Labour, Rural Development, local government, Social Justice and Empowerment, Communication and Information Technology, Industry, Transport, Housing and Urban Development, Finance, Information and Broadcasting, Law, Home Affairs, Food Processing Industries, Pharmaceuticals, Environment and Forests, traditional health care approaches such as Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy (AYUSH), Youth Affairs and Sports), nongovernmental organizations, academia, civil society for a “Whole of Government” and “Whole of Society” approach for prevention and control of NCDs

    2.15. Promoting and strengthening communication between AYUSH and Conventional Medicine for Prevention and control of NCDs

    2.16. Developing and implementing standard integrative guidelines/protocols for prevention, surveillance and management incorporating evidence based Ayurveda and Yoga interventions may be developed, validated, disseminated and adopted for primary and secondary prevention of NCDs and holistic healthcare of patients

    2.17. Implementing economic and trade policies to mitigate the risk factors contributing to the NCDs such as progressive increase in taxes on tobacco products, alcohol, unhealthy food products and beverages e. g., Sugar Sweetened Beverages and at the same time incentivising and subsidization of production and marketing of healthy foods, products and equipment

    2.18. Strengthening national surveillance systems, with emphasis on monitoring NCDs, the related risk factors and the underlying determinants as well as research on NCD prevention and control

    2.19. Setting measurable indicators, in line with WHO's 25 by 25 goals and voluntary targets under NCD Action Plans, and sustainable development goal (SDG) 3.4 to monitor progress at regular intervals in the prevention and control of NCDs and the promotion of healthy lifestyles

    2.20. Mandating concurrent health impact assessment an integral component of all ongoing and new public policies on trade, agriculture, education, rural and urban development, among others

    2.21. Strengthening epidemiological research to study trends and impact of public health interventions and implementation of programmes for NCD prevention and treatment

    2.22. Strengthening implementation research capacity to apply best practices and proven interventions from other geographies in their own countries.

  5. In supporting these commitments made in this Chandigarh Call for Action on NCDs, we the participants of the World Noncommunicable Diseases Congress 2017 urge the global community to:


  6. 3.1. Raise the priority of NCDs at the national and international/global health and development agenda

    3.2. Strengthen the health system by focusing on health financing for universal access

    3.3. Align the NCD agenda with SDGs to be achieved by 2030

    3.4. Mobilize additional resources and support innovative initiatives for financing health promotion and prevention and control of NCDs

    3.5. Equip the health work force at all levels of the health systems with the skills needed for NCD prevention and care

    3.6. Facilitate sharing of new research findings and best practices across the globe about prevention, health promotion and control of NCDs and their risk factors

    3.7. Improve access to essential medicine and basic technologies

    3.8. Initiate global action to protect public interest from the undue influence of conflict of interest that promote risk factors for NCDs

    3.9. Promote evidence based traditional systems of medicine, internationally recognized health promotional activities such as Yoga, meditation etc., at various levels of the health care system for prevention and control of NCDs

    3.10. Establish “National Institutes of NCDs” in all countries.


* Draft Committee for Consensus Statement of World NCD Congress 2017: Dr. Arun Chokalingam, Chair, Scientific Committee, World NCD Congress 2017; Dr. Subhash Varma, Ex-Dean, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; Dr. Dhirendra Sinha, Convenor, Scientific Committee, World NCD Congress 2017; Dr. Celina Gorre, Executive Director, Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases, USA; Dr DC Katoch, Advisor (Ayurveda), Government of India, New Delhi, India; Dr. Fikru Tullu, Team Leader (NCD), World Health Organization, New Delhi, India; Dr. Jagdish Kaur, Regional Adviser, Tobacco Free Initiative, NDE, WHO SEARO, India; Prof. J S Thakur, President World NCD Federation, Chair, World NCD Congress 2017 and Professor, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; Dr. Rajeev Kumar, Director (NCD), Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, New Delhi, India and Dr. Thaksaphon Thamarangsi, Director, Noncommunicable Diseases and Environmental Health, New Delhi, India.

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the World NCD Federation, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research Chandigarh, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.






 

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